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Cooking and Grocery Shopping in Norway


Cooking in Norway can be tricky at first.  In fact, it can be tricky even after living here for years!  We have put together several resources that can help you confidently prepare the dishes you're famous for.

Meat Cuts
Even the most fluent Norwegian and English speakers struggle with knowing the terms for the various cuts of meat in both languages.  Thankfully, MatPrat has put together a list of the various meat cuts and their translations: http://old.matprat.no/nyttig-a-vite/oppdeling/stykningsdeler-pa-engelsk/.

If that link is not working, we have saved the same information here (HTML web page) and here (PDF).

Grocery Store "Etiquette"

Grocery cashiers are usually seated, as opposed to standing.  In some stores, if you transact in cash, you will need to put your coins into an electronic box, where they are counted and sorted by the register.  If you get change, it will come out of the same electronic box.

Grocery bags are not free.  You select or ask for the number of bags you think you need and the cashier will ring them up with your order.  The bags cost a small amount.  Some stores offer free bags on Saturday, like Meny at CCVest.  You are expected to bag your own groceries in most stores, although some stores like Meny have started offering grocery bagging services, typical to what you receive at most chains in the U.S.

Shopping on Sundays

Another thing that takes a long time to adjust to is the stores being closed on Sundays.  Stores larger than a size specified by the government are required to be closed on Sundays.  Stores smaller than this size are permitted to be open for business, which is why many small "mom and pop" shops are open on Sundays.  Here are some other options available to you:

The Kiwi chain of grocery stores has started re-designing their stores so that a small portion of the store that falls within the government's requirements can be open on Sundays.  Look for these special Kiwis by their hours posted on the shop.  Their Sunday hours should be featured prominently, if available.

Røtter is a organic foods store that sells all manner of things økologisk (organic).  They have everything from eggs, meats, breads, produce, canned goods, dried goods, beauty products, alternative milks, and much more.  They also have many items that might be hard to find in a regular Norwegian grocery store (like Burt's Bees products, agave syrup, Lärabars, etc.).  And perhaps best of all, they're open on Sundays!

Some grocery stores, regardless of their size, are open on Sundays if they are considered to be in a "tourist area." If you're out and about in Norway, check your local stores hours to see if they are open on Sundays.

Hard-to-Find Items

Many products are not available for sale here in Norway that are available back home.  Some things still aren't here (like Velveeta and Febreze), while other things are turning up all the time (like Dr. Pepper and chocolate Philadelphia cream cheese).  Check out our forums for products our members have come across and want to share.  In general, the following stores have better than average selections of American products:

Meny at CCVest
Meny at Ringnes Park
Centra and Jacob's chain

If you come across something you think your fellow AWC members would like to get their hands on, please let share it in the forums and/or let us know by emailing info@awcoslo.org.

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American Women’s Club of Oslo
P.O. Box 3138 Elisenberg 0207
Oslo, Norway
+47 400 42 917
info@awcoslo.org

 

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